CALIPARI: SOLIDSHOT HELPS PLAYERS “SELF-EVALUATE AND BE SELF-CRITICAL”

By now you have heard  about how SOLIDshot helps to improve basketball players’ free throws by helping reinforce proper technique and create consistency.

But what it also does is teach the player using it to do more self evaluation when it comes to perfecting his or her shot.

Just as University of Kentucky head coach John Calipari, who got to see the sleeve in action when the SOLIDshot team visited the Wildcat’s practice facility.

“This is a device that I see as something that can get (players) on the floor more, get them more consistent in what they are doing and let them be self-critical.”

Sure, any player can practice on their own. The SOLIDshot system is taking that to the next level, by putting a coach’s notes right on their arm and allowing them to correct their technique and build up consistency on their own time. This innovative way of getting players to self-critique is a hit for big-name coach Calipari.

“I’m always looking for things that will encourage players to get on that floor,” he said.

Suffice to say, the Wildcats’ head coach—and author of a new book due out in bookstores  at the end of this year—knows a thing or two about what gets basketball players to perform at to the fullest potential. This is the coach that NBA standouts Anthony Davis and John Wall, just to name a couple, played for during their NCAA tenure.

If he says it is an important tool as a player to be able to self-evaluate, you know it is sound knowledge.

“The elite athletes that I’ve coached—and I’ve coached some—they are all self-critical,” Calipari pointed out before giving the ultimate example: “Derrick Rose was harder on himself than I ever was.”

The SOLIDshot system can make players just as self-analytical as Rose and other pros by allowing the wearer to practice the fundamentals of shooting after practice has concluded. Coaches set up the smart sleeve and app to correct player’s shooting form, and then the player can use it both during practice and on their own time.

Clearly, using the SOLIDshot system can help players implement what coach John Calipari sees as important steps in practicing.

“Spend more time. Self-evaluate and be self-critical.”

COACH: PLAYERS GAIN INDEPENDENCE & CONFIDENCE

New technology can be an intimidating thing. The SOLIDshot system is no stranger to that.

This innovation in sports tech has prospective buyers—young athletes and their families, mainly—wondering what makes this next-level sleeve and phone app so superior. Why buy this fancy new sleeve when I can just send my child to basketball camp?-is a common question. At first glance, this new tech might seem like just a stunt.

But take it from Aaron Locks, founder and CEO of National Academy of Athletics and a veteran in the basketball camp realm—the SOLIDshot system is no joke.

“I’m not a gimmick guy,” Locks said matter-of-a-factly during a phone interview. “What this sleeve does is so unique.”

Locks, who played college basketball and now coaches, gives SOLIDshot his stamp of approval and views it as a tool that coaches should be using to expand shooting practice—not replace practicing with a coach. After having his own son use the sleeve and app, Locks told me that SOLIDshot gives players a sense of “independence” and that he believes it could have a lasting effect on basketball.

“Players are spending much more time in the weight room instead of perfecting their shot,” he said. “If it is used right, because of how the NBA is changing… I believe that players that have access to the sleeve will become more comfortable with missing shots.”

Let’s go back to that last part for a minute: Missing shots? Why would a player want to miss shots? The point of sending our kids to basketball camp is to help players improve their shot, not make them feel better about missing them, right?

Locks explained that shooting is about proper technique, not whether or not the ball goes into the basket. “Offense is one of the toughest things to teach,” he said. “Perfect practice makes perfect.” Basically, instead of encouraging poor shooting form because it might make the ball go into the basket, the sleeve reinforces proper technique on the road to perfecting a player’s free throws. The more that proper fundamentals are reinforced, the better a player’s offense will become.

This is where SOLIDshot comes in—teaching the right technique, then allowing the players to build off of that with improved shooting. (Much like we saw in the study with the University of Maryland men’s basketball team.)

The smart sleeve is also bringing practice to a whole new level by putting young players in control of the way they practice. It allows players to continue perfecting their shot on their own time, long after they have left camp or after-school practice.

“The thing we forget is that 78-percent of what kids hear is correction,” Locks pointed out. “They’re constantly being told what to do.” SOLIDshot changes that, he continued, by giving players “independence” and making them “feel more empowered.”   

Locks likened this to having his son, Mason, practice with the SOLIDshot sleeve. Not only was the sleeve easy to set up, but it also gave Mason the freedom to practice on his own. “I’ve been coaching my son since he was in the second grade,” Locks reflected, “and this changed the dynamic of me coaching him, since it gave him so much independence.”

Plus—his offense began to improve. “He has this confidence,” Locks exclaimed. “He has this ‘swagger’ from his offense coming around.”

So, SOLIDshot has the backing of this esteemed member of the basketball community. Would he recommend the product to others?

Locks said he thinks the smart sleeve could be an especially useful tool for players at the high school level. “I would definitely recommend it,” he said.

 

 

University of Maryland Case Study (Part 3 of 3)

SOLIDshot teamed up with the University of Maryland men's basketball team to see just how much NCAA players' free throw percentage could improve once they started practicing with the smart sleeve. Here is what additional, in-depth information they found.

The SOLIDshot smart sleeve and app target a few different aspects of a player's shooting motion in order to give proper feedback. One of those key components that the smart sleeve focuses on is the upward extension of the player's arm.

In what is considered a "textbook shot," a player starts with the shooting arm bent at the elbow at a 90-degree angle, with the elbow pointing towards the basket. As the arm fully extends and the wrist snaps forward, it should develop upward—not outward—towards the basket. Higher placement of the shooting arm results in a high arc of the ball. 

what_is_arm_height.jpg

During the study conducted with the University of Maryland men's basketball team, a select number of players used the SOLIDshot sleeve as an extended coaching tool to improve their free throws. With the compiled data from the app, it also shows that SOLIDshot can help improve how consistently a player can extend their arm the proper amount upward.

We now zero in on one particular player — who is to remain anonymous due to NCAA rules — whose individual free throw percentage improved by 10%. A key with this this particular player was to track his arm height with each shot, with the goal being to get his arm higher when he released the ball. Observing his data from the SOLIDshot app, we find that this player improved on extending his arm in the proper upward motion, and then again readjusted to elevating his arm more after a dip in his stats. 

UMD Player's Arm Height during 2015-2016 Preseason

UMD Player's Arm Height during 2015-2016 Preseason

This showed two things: That SOLIDshot can help players "get their arm up," and that constant use of the sleeve can help make corrections when a player hits a rough patch. It goes back to a comment made by UMD assistant coach John Auslander, that using the smart sleeve throughout a season can be beneficial. "Game to game, guys can get hot or get cold," he said. "All we have to do is put the sleeve back on. We have their numbers locked in, and we can get them improving their shot and getting it back to where it was when it was at its best."

University of Maryland Case Study (Part 2 of 3)

SOLIDshot teamed up with the University of Maryland men's basketball team to see just how much NCAA players' free throw percentage could improve once they started practicing with the smart sleeve. Here is what additional, in-depth information they found.

The SOLIDshot smart sleeve and app target a few different aspects of a player's shooting motion in order to give proper feedback. One of those key components is the snap of the wrist. 

The ability to cock the wrist back towards the forearm—much like a catapult—and flick it back towards the basket as the shooting arm extends upward, is what creates backspin on the ball. Not only can it make or break a shot, but it is an aspect of the shooting motion that is difficult to repeat consistently.

During the study conducted with the University of Maryland men's basketball team, a select number of players used the SOLIDshot sleeve as an extended coaching tool to improve their free throws. The data compiled from the app show also showed that SOLIDshot can help improve a player's wrist snap.

We now zero in on one particular player—who is to remain anonymous due to NCAA rules—whose individual free throw percentage improved by 8%. This player was also working on improving his wrist snap at the end of his shots. Observing his data in the SOLIDshot app, it was also revealed that the snap in his wrist increased and became more consistent over the period of time that the study was conducted

UMD Player's Wrist Snap during 2015-2016 Preseason

UMD Player's Wrist Snap during 2015-2016 Preseason

This helps to illustrate how SOLIDshot's positive feedback system can create repetition in players finding their proper form with every shot.  "When it's buzzing them, telling them 'good job,' they can really get into a rhythm and they can start to get a feel for what their ultimate shot is," UMD assistant coach John Auslander said. 

University of Maryland Case Study (Part 1 of 3)

It took years of testing and refinement before SOLIDshot was ready to be introduced to the public in the summer of 2016. Part of that process meant taking the smart sleeve and its coordinating phone app out onto the basketball court.

And who better to take the smart sleeve for a test drive than the future generation of basketball pros? 

SOLIDshot teamed up with the University of Maryland men’s basketball team to see just how much NCAA players' free throw percentage could improve once they started practicing with the smart sleeve.

The result? SOLIDshot not only helped to increase free throw consistency in players who used it more than those who didn’t, but also boosted confidence in the players that used it and encouraged the coaching staff to want to use the sleeve on a regular basis. 

"SOLIDshot really helped our players shoot with confidence," University of Maryland men’s basketball head coach Mark Turgeon said of the study. "Our free throw percentage went up six-percent as a team, which helped us win many close games."

During three weeks of preseason play, a select group of players used SOLIDshot in the UMD practice facility. These athletes participated in the same shooting drills in the same environment as those players who practiced without it. The only difference in those practices for players wearing SOLIDshot came from the instant audio and visual feedback that comes from using the smart sleeve and coordinating phone app—feedback on the elevation of the player’s arm, the bend of his elbow and the snap in his wrist. UMD assistant coach John Auslander, who ran the study with the players, spoke in a video for the site and mentioned how much the sleeve and app "helps (the players) focus on all of the little details of their shots." 

Paying attention to those little details produced big return. In comparing stats via ESPN.com, the players who practiced using the SOLIDshot system saw greater rise in their free throw percentages from the 2014-15 season to the following 2015-16 season.

In addition to calculating and correcting, the smart sleeve also gives positive feedback. When players achieve the right arm angle and wrist snap in their shot, SOLIDshot alerts the player that they did something right, encouraging repetition. Auslander is a fan of the "psychology" behind using the smart sleeve and app.  "When it’s buzzing them, telling them 'good job,' they can really get into a rhythm and they can start to get a feel for what their ultimate shot is."

One of the most positive aspects to come out of the study was finding out that this isn't just a "one-and-done" system either. Auslander acknowledged that SOLIDshot serves a purpose throughout the course of a season.

"Game to game, guys can get hot or get cold," he said. "All we have to do is put the sleeve back on. We have their numbers locked in, and we can get them improving their shot and getting it back to where it was when it was at its best."

Check back in next week for more on what was revealed when SOLIDshot visited University of Maryland. 

 

THE SCIENCE OF SHOOTING: THE INSIDE OUT SHOT

This week let’s look at The Inside Out Shot.

science_shooting_inside_out_animated

The inside out shot is typical technique for shooters who are right-handed and left-eye dominant, or left-handed and right-eye dominant. (Test which eye is dominant using this test.)  

Right handers will bring the ball up the left side of their face, causing their elbows to angle outwards. They often support the ball with their left hand more than usual, because their shooting hand is not directly under the ball. This narrows the time window for a successful release. If the shooter releases too early, it causes the ball to miss left. If the shooter releases too late, it causes the ball to miss right.

Over the summer we’ll take an in-depth look at eight different shot styles in a new series, THE SCIENCE OF SHOOTING. Stay tuned!

Order SOLIDshot now!

After four years of development and two years of refinement on NBA and NCAA courts, basketball smart sleeve SOLIDshot ™ is now available on our website: http://solidshot.com

SOLIDshot is equivalent to a 120 fps high-speed motion capture system, minus the tedious wait for analysis. Four independent computers coordinate hundreds of times per second to analyze your motion in real-time. SOLIDshot's patent-pending four-dimensional calibration system ensures degree-level accuracy.

The revolutionary smart sleeve guides basketball players to improve their shooting form and boost consistency. Using multiple sensors on a player’s shooting arm, SOLIDshot constantly analyzes motion, recognizes a shot, and gives instant feedback the moment the ball leaves the player’s hands. The user-friendly app offers in-depth analytics on shooting form, using advanced algorithms to generate simple, constructive feedback for the player.

The more players use SOLIDshot, the more accurate and consistent their shots become. Studies have shown that NBA players can improve their shot in as little as one session.  Hall of Famer and 14-time NBA All-Star Jerry West called SOLIDshot a “phenomenal shooting system for both experienced and young, aspiring players that are serious about improving their shooting skills."

The SOLIDshot smart sleeve is priced at $499 retail— in honor of the launch, SOLIDshot will be available for $249 through August 11th at solidshot.com. Deliveries will begin at the start of the winter basketball season.

THE SCIENCE OF SHOOTING: THE SHORT ARM SHOT

Next up is The Short Arm Shot.

The short arm shot is common among mid-range shooters, who are afraid of shooting the ball too hard and don’t follow all the way through. It adds difficulty to the shot, because they can finish in so many different positions.

 

Short arm shooters tend to release the ball early, snapping their wrist before the arm is fully extended.

 

Over the summer we’ll take an in-depth look at eight different shot styles in a new series, THE SCIENCE OF SHOOTING. Stay tuned!

CHANGE YOUR GAME: SOLIDshot is on sale July 13th

After four years of development and two years of refinement on the court, the time has finally come to introduce SOLIDshot to consumers.

 

The revolutionary smart sleeve guides basketball players to improve their shooting form and boost consistency. Using multiple sensors on a player’s shooting arm, SOLIDshot constantly analyzes motion, recognizes a shot, and gives instant feedback the moment the ball leaves the player’s hands. The user-friendly app offers in-depth analytics on shooting form, using advanced algorithms to generate simple, constructive feedback for the player.

The more players use SOLIDshot, the more accurate and consistent their shots become. Studies have shown that NBA players can improve their shot in as little as one session.  Hall of Famer and 14-time NBA All-Star Jerry West called SOLIDshot a “phenomenal shooting system for both experienced and young, aspiring players that are serious about improving their shooting skills."

Until now, SOLIDshot has only been available to a limited number of NCAA and NBA teams. On July 13, it will be available for everyone to order.

The SOLIDshot smart sleeve is priced at $499 retail— in honor of the launch, SOLIDshot will be available for $249 for the first 30 days. Deliveries will begin at the start of the winter basketball season.

Visit the SOLIDshot team in Las Vegas at the NBA Summer League, July 8-July 18, to learn more.

THE SCIENCE OF SHOOTING: THE HIGH REACH SHOT

Next up is the The High Reach Shot

The high reach shot is common among taller players who are taught to keep the ball up on rebounds and inside moves. Unfortunately, it carries over to their shot form.

 

High reach shooters extend their arm fully before releasing the ball, losing the power and momentum of their arm unhinging. The shot relies fully on wrist strength.  The wrist the most inconsistent element of the shot.

Over the summer we’ll take an in-depth look at eight different shot styles in a new series, THE SCIENCE OF SHOOTING. Stay tuned!